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Recover from saved file

Hi Everyone,
I had an incident the other evening, when a mistimed key stroke or two managed to wipe what I had just written on my ‘scene.’

I was able to get it back using the crtl + z function. But it lead me to wonder, if I did have a total disaster how do I recover / reload my work from a save?

I’m sure this has been answered elsewhere, so sorry for repeating the question.

Chris.

If you overwrite something you wrote yesterday or last week, this can be recovered. You can read about all the backups features in SmartEdit Writer here:

https://www.smart-edit.com/Blog/Post/SmartEditWriterBackups/

If you wrote a scene today and overwrote it today, then that’s lost for ever. SmartEdit Writer doesn’t backup as you write, only at the end of a writing session. So, when you’re finished for the day, close the project. If you leave it open for days on end on a sleeping PC, no backups will be made.

You might want to look into a great little program called Second Copy, which keeps an eye on any files or folders you specify, and makes multiple version copies in some other folder – at whatever frequency you like. When I’m on a roll, I let Second Copy make backups every couple of minutes. You can set up multiple “profiles,” so one of them keeps 2-minute backups, another keeps 10-minute backups, another 30-minute, another daily, etc. If you’re like me, there are times when things flow so fast that there’s no way to recreate them if they get deleted. SC is perfect for those situations. All these backed up versions don’t take up much space, either, and you can stash them anywhere, even in a ZIP file or over your LAN.

Allen

Allen,
Monitoring the forum of course, I saw you mentioning Second Copy. Had to search for it quick and downloaded the v9 manual.
I need to compare this with SyncBack SE [the one I run for years now], and see which one is more suitable for me. Sometimes one get stuck in a routine so much, that better options are not reaching your mind as long as everything works fine.
The first impression from their website is a pretty good one. The manual will give me more info in detail. :slight_smile:
The multiple profiles you mentioned caught my eye. Thanks for mentioning it.

I think you’ll find Second Copy is extremely versatile. I wrote a similar program about 25 years ago, and used it in a business office environment to back up each employee’s files onto their neighbor’s computer throughout the day (every 5 minutes). Since most files don’t change very often, only a few small files traversed the LAN every now and then, but each employee had a spare copy of what their neighbor was working on, which made it easy to recover something – just ask your co-worker.

After using it for a year or so, I discovered Centered Systems and Second Copy. It was very much better than the quick utility I had written, so we bought a site license. I’ve been running it on every system I have used ever since then. It has never – and I mean NEVER – crashed. I don’t think they have done any development for several years (there are a few refinements I’ve asked for, and they don’t seem actively involved anymore). But they have released invisible revisions when Windows updates cause minor issues.

There are also “secret” over-rides for some subtle technical situations, involving a text file that it reads when starting up. If you have problems, they DO respond to emails. That is, the company is not dead, but it seems uninterested in further development. I’d love to know how many copies they sell each year, since I haven’t seen an advertisement in many years!

Thank you for your replies. I will check out the backup software mentioned.
What I have started doing is using the “export as” a Word document as a draft usually when I pause for thought during my writing process. I then copy that over to Evernote so I have an accessible online copy.
This was a habit I got into many years ago when I owned an Apple IIc that would crash every now and again, so ctrl + s was my friend. (I won’t even begin to talk about the reliability of the floppy drives!)