Atomic Scribbler Home · SmartEdit Home · Help

Mini feature request: Zoom by Ctrl+Mouse Wheel


#1

Good afternoon

Atomicscribbler is very useful, but one thing is annoying:
Zoom in/out neither has hotkeys nor it supports Ctrl+Mouse Wheel

Because Zoom is assigned to Ctrl+Mouse Wheel in most Windows Applications like M$ Office: please add this function, too.
And for disabled users, having Hotkeys like Ctrl + and Ctrl - (as we have it in most Browsers), would be useful, too. :slight_smile:

Thanks a lot, kind regards,
Thomas


#2

Hi Jehoschua,

The first thing that comes to my mind - if Darren implements this - is the exclusion of those writers who use AS on their laptop with the [build-in] touchpad instead of a mouse. Some people are on the road without carrying an additional mouse along. They need to be able to zoom in or out as well. Ever thought about that? :slight_smile: :slight_smile:

Hans


#3

using any combo of mouse wheel, keyboard, as well as touch screen to zoom in and out would be ideal for me as I have poor vision and need bigger fonts than is usual in writing.

I do not know if the touch screen interface is part of the display magic, or it has to be supported within the application, but the ideal situation would be to have support for all available methods of zooming.


#4

Zooming on a touchpad device is never a problem: they use two fingers.
I guess it already works. (Otherwise, it does not harm if touchpad devices supports zooming, too, of course) .

But (of course), I would never use a touchpad device with atomscribbler. Here, Typing is the most usual work and for that, a traditional Keybaord is still the best tool for that :slight_smile:


#5

This is an interesting topic — one that actually came up way back when version 1 was first built. The middle click functionality described was once built into Atomic, but I took it out as it caused so much problems when it was inadvertently triggered on touchpads on lap tops, something that was happening to users often enough to be a vocal problem.

The big difference between Word and Atomic in this regard is that Atomic’s zoom setting is global — it doesn’t just apply to a single document. An inadvertent change here changes the setting for all scenes and for all projects.

My reasoning at the time I took it out was that as the setting was a global one, a user who wanted larger fonts would only need to click the zoom button once and the setting would then be remembered for all time. They wouldn’t have to do it for each scene. I had to weigh this against repeated problems for users who inadvertently triggered a zoom anytime their touch pad activity simulated a middle mouse click.

Adding in the Ctrl+ and - shortcuts is certainly an option though, one that I will look at.


#6

I don’t want to go into an argument with you, Jehoschua, but you’re shooting from the hip. It;s easy to claim that zooming can be done with two fingers. You need to keep in mind that not all touch pads are gesture capable. Some have still the basics of cursor movement, left and right mouse button, and scrolling only. They would luck out.

A note on the side: I’m not one of them. I use a mouse and have my notebook’s touch pad deliberately deactivated. I had too often unwanted reactions. Too touchy. :slight_smile:


#7

Ctrl+ and Ctrl- work very well for me, in all my computing environments. I’m very accustomed to using those, in part because they’re supported so widely, and especially in browsers. Scroll wheels have a variety of functions in different apps, so I don’t “expect” to zoom that way (although it’s fine in most contexts, some graphics apps do very different things with it). So I cast my vote for the Ctrl features.

That said, I wouldn’t mind at all if most of these display and format settings were document-specific, but I’ll leave that for Darren to evaluate. I write a lot of different kinds of material, and it is definitely helpful to have visual distinctions among them, including size, fonts, page background, para styles, etc.

But I’m trying to keep my suggestions within the scope of primary functionality while the program is still so fresh and simple.

Allen